Joint Senate Informational Hearing: Representative Democracy for a Growing California

Should Counties Have Elected Executives and Larger Boards?

Friday, October 21, 2016

 

California’s 58 counties range in size from tiny Alpine County to Los Angeles County with over 10 million residents. While the City and County of San Francisco is governed by an eleven-member board and elected mayor, each of the other 57 counties is governed by a five-member board with no elected countywide executive. The Senate Committee on Elections and Constitutional Amendments, chaired by Senator Ben Allen (D - Santa Monica) and the Senate Committee on Governance and Finance, chaired by Senator Robert Hertzberg (D - Van Nuys), will explore whether Californians, especially those residing in large counties, would be better served by larger governing boards and/or an elected county executive.

 

What: The Senate Committee on Elections and Constitutional Amendments, chaired by Senator Ben Allen and the Senate Committee on Governance and Finance, chaired by Senator Robert Hertzberg, will conduct an informational hearing on Representative Democracy for a Growing California: Should Counties Have Elected Executives and Larger Boards?

 

When: Thursday, October 27, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.

 

Where: Metropolitan Water District Main Headquarters
700 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012

 

Who: Witnesses include Zev Yaroslavsky, Former Member, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, Richard Polanco, Former Majority Leader, California State Senate, David Janssen, Former Chief Executive Officer, Los Angeles County, Deanna Kitamura, Project Director, Voting Rights Project, Asian Americans Advancing Justice - Los Angeles, Matthew Barragan, Staff Attorney, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and Rosalind Gold, Senior Director of Policy, Research and Advocacy, National Association of Latino Elected Officials Educational Fund
 

Online: The hearing will be livestreamed at: ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPtVblNDmFc

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